Tagged: Dave Trembley

Checking in and checking it out…

The Winter Meetings have begun in the sense that most team executives have checked in to their respective hotels and that the lobby of the Indianapolis Marriott Downtown is already full of loitering reporters. The scene is subdued, at least in relation to the sensory overload of last year’s industry convention at the ultra-opulent Bellagio in Las Vegas.

Things will likely swing into gear on Monday, when executives begin meeting with their peers to lay the groundwork for trades and with agents to discuss the burgeoning free agent market. Baltimore manager Dave Trembley will stage a group interview, and Andy MacPhail, the team’s president of baseball operations will meet with local reporters on a daily basis.

That’s all the news for now, but check back often Monday through Thursday for updates.

— Spencer Fordin
http://spencerfordin.mlblogs.com/

 

 

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Trembley plays it quiet on coaches

Baltimore manager Dave Trembley just learned that he’ll be coming back next year, and now he wants some time to decide on his coaching staff. Trembley parried several questions about his coaches Saturday, saying only that he wants time to make a decision.

“I’m going to allow myself to go home on Monday afternoon,” said Trembley of the season’s endgame. “And I’m going to allow myself an opportunity to unpack and put some closure on this season, to think about what may be areas that could be improved and what I can do to make it better. Then I’m going to talk to [executive Andy MacPhail] about it and I’m going to call each and every coach individually and tell them what their status will be for next year.”

Trembley said he has already spoken to MacPhail, the team’s president of baseball operations, about his coaching staff. And to illustrate his point, Trembley told an anecdote about a recent organizational meeting and a conversation he had with MacPhail.

“We had a meeting in Tampa with all the coaching staff and Andy MacPhail and other front office personnel,” said Trembley setting the stage for his comment. “That night in Tampa, Andy said, ‘What do you think? I thought the meeting went really well.’ I said, ‘Well, I’m going to tell you something about the coaches that you have here: They have passion. Everybody has passion about the players, especially the guys they work with in their areas.’ “

— Spencer Fordin
http://spencerfordin.mlblogs.com/

Turn the other glove

The Orioles and Rangers engaged in a bout of ***-for-tat on Friday night, when both objected to a light colored glove on an opposing pitcher’s hand. Texas starter Scott Feldman was forced to change his glove for something darker before the bottom of the second started, and Baltimore reliever Cla Meredith was subjected to the same treatment in the seventh.

Meredith, incidentally, said it was the same glove he’s worn all season, but Baltimore manager Dave Trembley said that second-base umpire Joe West got the call right.

“It’s a white glove. You can’t do that,” said Trembley. “We’ve got the right guy here to make sure that’s enforced. Country Joe is going to make sure that’s taken care of. What’s good for the goose is good for the gander. We had to do it with Feldman, so then they had to do it with Cla, and he’s absolutely right. That’s the rule and those guys were told in spring training not to do that. He was absolutely right to enforce that.”
 

First things first

Brian Matusz had gotten through his first four starts without allowing a hit to a left-handed hitter, but that trend ended in the first inning Tuesday night. Matusz, who had held lefties to 0-for-8 before Tuesday, retired Denard Span but gave up a hit to Joe Mauer.

Matusz came right back to strike out Justin Morneau, another left-handed hitter. Manager Dave Trembley said before the game that he’d be interested to watch those matchups.

“I think for Matusz it’s going to be pitch ahead, stay away from the walk,” he said. “It probably would be to his advantage if those big guys don’t come up with men on base. There’s not too many times you’re going to get Mauer to take an oh-fer. And Morneau was probably just getting back into it after missing a few days. I’d expect today he’d be a ball of fire.”

— Spencer Fordin
http://spencerfordin.mlblogs.com/

O’

How do you prepare for a pitcher who’s about to make his Major League debut? By watching video. Baltimore manager Dave Trembley said Tuesday that he doesn’t know much about Minnesota starter Armando Gabino beyond what he’s seen in film study.

“He throws a changeup, not a split,” said Trembley of the rookie right-hander. “He throws a slider, a sinker. He was a reliever. I’m sure he’ll be very excited to pitch. “

Trembley went on to say that Gabino is just like every other rookie in one respect: He’ll be excited to make his debut and perhaps a bit anxious about the challenge in front of him.

“What I’ve always found with young guys making their first start is if you get a chance early, you’d better not let them off the ropes,” he said. “Because if you let them off the ropes, they’ll take a deep breath and feel like they got a second wind. You can’t let them have it.”

— Spencer Fordin
http://spencerfordin.mlblogs.com/

O’s prepare for rookie starter

How do you prepare for a pitcher who’s about to make his Major League debut? By watching video. Baltimore manager Dave Trembley said Tuesday that he doesn’t know much about Minnesota starter Armando Gabino beyond what he’s seen in film study.

“He throws a changeup, not a split,” said Trembley of the rookie right-hander. “He throws a slider, a sinker. He was a reliever. I’m sure he’ll be very excited to pitch. “

Trembley went on to say that Gabino is just like every other rookie in one respect: He’ll be excited to make his debut and perhaps a bit anxious about the challenge in front of him.

“What I’ve always found with young guys making their first start is if you get a chance early, you’d better not let them off the ropes,” he said. “Because if you let them off the ropes, they’ll take a deep breath and feel like they got a second wind. You can’t let them have it.”

— Spencer Fordin
http://spencerfordin.mlblogs.com/

New place, familiar feel

The Orioles arrived at the new Yankee Stadium for their first series of the season against New York on Tuesday, and many couldn’t help but marvel at the accomodations. Baltimore was the last team to play at old Yankee Stadium, giving the Orioles perspective on the new one.

“Big. Bright. It’s impressive,” said manager Dave Trembley. “It’s beautiful, it really is. …They brought a lot of the memories over here I think with the monuments out in center field.”